What Makes A Classic Film Classic…?

That was the question once asked by writer Ted Elrick, his answer coming in the form  the essay Classic is in the Eye—and Mind—of the Beholder (as published in DGA News Magazine, Feb. 1992). Elrick gave the daunting task of defining that elusive quality which differentiates a good movie from a classic film to over 100 […]

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Film Fashion Frenzy: Cinema Fashion Shops of the 1930s

This post is in conjunction with today’s Fashion in Film Blogathon behing hosted by the lovely Angela at The Hollywood Revue! Scene: Main Street, USA. 1937. Boy and girl at the local theatre watching the new Carole Lombard comedy Nothing Sacred. Lots of laughter, lots of coddling. The sight of Lombard in a voluminous yet […]

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Hot Town, Summer in the (New York) City

I’m a Los Angeleno by birth, a Londoner by heart, and an aspiring New Yorker. Having just returned from another whirlwind trip in the City That Never Sleeps, that honeymoon glow is still warm enough to post some of my favorite street view snaps from the City that I’m falling more, all the more, head […]

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The Red Shoes: Art for Art’s Sake

David Thomson is one of my favorite film critics, if for no other reason than he’s not above throwing film theory out the window to say, in effect, “I like it because I like it SO THERE.” I’m always game to read a good shadowplay soapbox from Thompson’s lovably cantankerous pen. The fact that when […]

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The Red Shoes: Art for Art's Sake

David Thomson is one of my favorite film critics, if for no other reason than he’s not above throwing film theory out the window to say, in effect, “I like it because I like it SO THERE.” I’m always game to read a good shadowplay soapbox from Thompson’s lovably cantankerous pen. The fact that when […]

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Getting Sentimental: Things My Granddad Told Me

So I’ve decided to do what I’ve wanted to do for years: document the stories my granddad and grandma raised me on. The stories that were, and still are, pivotal to the person I am. (For better or worse.) At the moment there isn’t structure to this– it is simply a late Sunday evening whim […]

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Larry, Vivien and Alfred Hitchcock’s Rebecca

(This post is in conjunction with the blog Viv and Larry’s Vivien Leigh and Laurence Olivier Blogathon.) Early in the summer of 1939, when principal photography on David O’Selznick’s soon-to-be masterpiece Gone with the Wind had finally finished, Vivien Leigh boarded a plane and headed to New York to be reunited with Laurence Olivier. She […]

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Larry, Vivien and Alfred Hitchcock's Rebecca

(This post is in conjunction with the blog Viv and Larry’s Vivien Leigh and Laurence Olivier Blogathon.) Early in the summer of 1939, when principal photography on David O’Selznick’s soon-to-be masterpiece Gone with the Wind had finally finished, Vivien Leigh boarded a plane and headed to New York to be reunited with Laurence Olivier. She […]

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A Life in Photographs: Linda McCartney

Oh Taschen. Yummy, delectable, I-want-to-devour-you-whole Tahhhh-Shen. So beautiful. So sumptuous. SO expensive. And yet, somehow, worth every blessed cent. Your anthologies agonize me with want. I covet your sweetly binded spines and secretly despise those who have your volumes proudly displayed on their hand-crafted cabinetry. I’m a hater, what can I say? I own one […]

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Pendersleigh and Sons… and the Lost Art of Cartography

The art of cartography is about as extinct as the art of the written letter. What need is there for a hand-drawn community renderings in the age of instant information, when most people have GPS maps on their cellphones? No need at all. But Los Angeles based writer Eric Brightwell doesn’t care. Hence this blog […]

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