Vintage Vanity Fair

Vanity Fair’s website has a nifty little feature that I think all you Pictorial readers might get a kick out of. Vintage Vanity Fair allows you to flip through (virtually speaking) a vintage issue of the magazine. The full January 1935 issue is up on their website and a heck of a lot of fun […]

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A Little Night Music: Café Culture in 50's Hollywood

Yes, I know it’s a symptom of my having been born in the wrong era, but there’s something about the red orange cigarette glow of a bohemian café in the 50s that drives me wild. Not that I by any means intend to romanticize a lifestyle that could lead to a chronic pulmonary disease, but […]

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A Little Night Music: Café Culture in 50’s Hollywood

Yes, I know it’s a symptom of my having been born in the wrong era, but there’s something about the red orange cigarette glow of a bohemian café in the 50s that drives me wild. Not that I by any means intend to romanticize a lifestyle that could lead to a chronic pulmonary disease, but […]

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Fun With Fred & Ginger

For no particular reason at all (and why else do we have blogs if not to indulge the whims of our wanton subconscious) today I remembered this scene from RKO’s 1935 film Roberta. The film was based on a smash Broadway musical with music and lyrics by the eternal Jerome Kern and although Fred Astaire […]

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Fun With Fred & Ginger

For no particular reason at all (and why else do we have blogs if not to indulge the whims of our wanton subconscious) today I remembered this scene from RKO’s 1935 film Roberta. The film was based on a smash Broadway musical with music and lyrics by the eternal Jerome Kern and although Fred Astaire […]

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Pictorial Movie of the Month: I Am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang

Director Mervyn LeRoy’s Filmography feels like an emotional pendulum: from fluffy escapism,(Gold Diggers of 1933) to family fantasies (The Wizard of Oz, 1939) to  sand-and-sandal epics (Quo Vadis, 1951) to aisle-rolling laffers (Mister Roberts, 1955). He also happens to have made the most unforgettable social comment films of the Depression era, first with 1931’s envelope-pushing […]

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Hollywood du Jour: The Brown Derby’s Cobb Salad

Betty Goodwin’s Lost Recipes of Legendary Hollywood Haunts is now an ear-marked, food-stained, go-to mainstay in my (admittedly scant) cookbook collection. “Since the twenties,” she writes, ” many of the community’s most legendary restaurants sprung up as colorfully as the larger-than-life personalities who frequented them. The tales behind the owners themselves (often rags-to-riches stories) rivaled […]

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Hollywood du Jour: The Brown Derby's Cobb Salad

Betty Goodwin’s Lost Recipes of Legendary Hollywood Haunts is now an ear-marked, food-stained, go-to mainstay in my (admittedly scant) cookbook collection. “Since the twenties,” she writes, ” many of the community’s most legendary restaurants sprung up as colorfully as the larger-than-life personalities who frequented them. The tales behind the owners themselves (often rags-to-riches stories) rivaled […]

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Starlit Days: Hollywood in Technicolor, 1935

As a big fan of 2 and 3-strip Technicolor, this film clip is a particularly sweet treat. On this perfectly lovely, frolicking day in 1935, Hollywood filmdom is captured in the sort of dreamy colors that only 3-strip Technicolor can produce. The novelty acts are a real kick (especially Cliff Edwards’ ukulele number), some of […]

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Two Modern Guys in Classic Hollywood

Jeffrey Vance and Tony Maietta are Hollywood’s resident time travelers. Classic film lovers may not readily recognize their names, but you certainly know their work: Vance is archivist for the film holdings of both the Chaplin family and the Harold Lloyd Trust, and has authored a superlative set of silent-film bios on Chaplin, Keaton and […]

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